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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
Al Jazeera America
Dec 3, 2013 1:00am EST
intelligence laws, the practices that our intelligence and liaison agencies are engaged in need to be subject to vigorous oversight, as transparent as possible. there needs to be public buy-in to what governments are doing to keep the citizens safe. i don't think there has been enough public discussion. edward snowden's acts are despicable. he's been charged and should return to this country and face those charges. stealing classifying information, the type he stole, is not okay with me period. what came from that is a public conversation we should have had a decade ago about practices and procedures that the government should engage in to keep us safe. what people understand better, what metadata is, that it's not a view into personal lives, but it's an insurance policy in case someone else, who may look and sound like them is engaged in bad stuff. once people understand that, they will support that. my difference with mike rogers is that our intelligence communities are not the bad guys. no, they are not. can they operate in a way that has wider public acceptance in you bet. >> in an articl
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm EST
dalibhunga, which means trouble maker, he lived up to his name. after studying law he dedicated himself to apartheid. a system imposed on the black african. nelson mandela was arrested in sentenced to life in prison. he spent 28 years behind bars, mostly in a tiny cell on robin island near cape town. nelson mandela's brutal imprisonment led to tuberculosis and damaged eye sight. his fame grew and the world clamoured for the release of a man the symbol of the civil rights movement. finally he walked out of prison. four years later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> te
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
. >> he is a very aggressive and intelligent and cerebral law enforcement enforcer. >> do you think he will to indown stototonedown stop and . >> i think so. he is the most talented law enforcer in the business. >> we should address that he served as police commissioner in la and new york city for the past 20 years and he was tremendously successful in both places. he pioneered and pushed forward the broken windows theory and he penaltwent after the little crid all of the little things that created a sense of disorder. and he created the comp stat program which used computer models and stats-for-high crime areas. how dramatic of effect has he had across the country. >> his programs have been implemented in baltimore and los angeles and you have gary mccarthy who has learned braton's ways and implemented them in cities like chicago the other thing about the commissioner, he has been sought after efe everywhere. he speaks and lectures everywhere he goes. he is an intel genlt intelligenl reread individual. he is going to continue to have a impact on law enforcement. >> the reaction has b
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 1:00am EST
is obamacare. listen to what the president had to say about that. >> the law is working in major way that benefits millions of americans right now, even as we have begun to slow the rides of healthcare costs, which is good for family budget did and good for federal and state budgets, and good for the budgets of businesses, small and large. so this law is going to work. and for the sake of our economic security, it needs to work. >> is he right, david? >> well, we need to have it work. america is spending for every dollar per person, on an equivalency basis, the other 33 modern countries in the world spend and they all have universal healthcare, many of them with no out-of-pocket charges, for every dollar they spend, we are spending $2 and 4 killing us, that's nonsense. i don't know how the doctors, an airline pilot. nobody shops for airline pilots. we expect the airline produces someone who knows what they are doing in the cockpit of the plane when we trust them with our lives. what obamacare does is addresses the free rider problem. >> that's people who don't buy insurance that end
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 10:00pm EST
to a royal trail troublemaker mandela lived up to his name, after studying law he dedicated himself to the nonviolent struggle against apartheid, the system of racial segregation imposed by south african on the majority blacks, indiaians and other people of color. but a massacre led him and his party to abandon civil disobedience and take armed. he spent almost 28 years behind bars. mandela's at times brutal imprisonment led to tuberculosis and damaged eyesight. the world clammored for the release of the man that became the symbol of civil rights movement. finally, he walked out of prison, to thunderous applause. four years later he was elected south africa's first black president. let's exam the man behind that status. our first guest had a strong personal connection to nelson mandela. he taught him and his grandmother visited the south african leadner prison. he joins us from massachusets, really a pleasure to be with you. thank you for joining us, i know you are the headmaster of the great tan school, and really very glad that you took time on what must be a hard day for you, giv
Al Jazeera America
Dec 2, 2013 9:00am EST
has lobbied across the world to get laws passed banning circle animals. you managed to do it in bolivia. the first country to do if. t. o it. two years later you find out that they had lions in horrific conditions it makes for a suspenseful documentary. let's look at you in action. in is not so stop it. >> some frightening moments there, jan. a whole number of circuses and a couple of dozen lions you saved. >> it was 29 lions in total and two res rescues. it focuses on the rescue of the whole of the 25 from bolivia. and as you say we worked undercover for two years. we released the findings to the public and the bolivian congress. and they decided they didn't want this going on in their country and they didn't want animals to suffer behind the scenes for a few minutes of entertainment. they were determined to ban them them. they stopped all animals from traveling in circuses. it was a year later when we went back to see if the government would back down by working with the government we were able to show them we were determined to enforce this law. >> bob you were have bee
Al Jazeera America
Dec 3, 2013 10:00pm EST
the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period. >> today's data dive gets preveny to examine the difference in gray matter between men and women. women have long claimed guys don't use their brains. turns out they may be half right. a university of pennsylvania study used brain imaging to look at brain cells at about 958 people. they found males have more pathways that run the length of each hemisphere while females had better communication between the two hem is fears. guys only use about half their brain while women use all of theirs. that shouldn't not' surprise anyone who watches a group of guys watching football at hooter's. any man who complains that his girlfriend always wants to talk about everything now has scientific proof. neural connections show females are better at facilitating communication between the analytical side of the brain
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 9:00am EST
. and then the second time i photographed him in in 1952 in his office in his law office he was then still working as a lawyer, and he had a law office in johannesberg, and again i asked him -- i was late for an appointment and due to traffic pms and i asked him if i could just -- he was about to leave -- if he could just hang on a minute and to photograph him and he totally stood still and posed for me, and then i -- i realized there was no -- >> we have to leave it. i'm terribly sorry. looking at your photographs and listening to you, a reminder of what a force of history he is. we appreciate you documenting that. . >> thank you very much. tÑ >> announcer: this is al jazeera. ♪ >> hello, welcome to the news hour on al jazeera, i'm adrian finnegan, with our continuing coverage of the life and death of nelson mandela. [ singing ] >> south africans remember the man who lead them out of white-only rule.
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)